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Apple’s Daisy Robot Recycle Components, Rare Earths of Dismantled iPhones

Apple is attempting to change the way electronics are recycled with a robot that dismantles its iPhone so that minerals might be recovered and reused while acknowledging rising global demand for electronics means new mines will nonetheless be required

The Cupertino, California-based firm says the robot is a part of its plan to become a “closed-loop” producer that doesn’t depend on the mining trade, an aggressive goal that some trade analysts have stated is impossible.

Many mining officials note that with the rising popularity of electric automobiles, newly mined minerals will likely be required on an even bigger scale, a reality that Apple acknowledges.

Inside an unnamed warehouse on the outskirts of Austin, Apple’s Daisy robot dismantles apple products so that 14 minerals, including lithium, might be extracted and recycled.

Apple today is using recycled tin, cobalt, and rare earth minerals in a few of its products, with plans so as to add to that list.

In December, the company purchased the first commercial batch of carbon-free aluminum from an alliance between Rio Tinto and Alcoa.

Daisy, less than 20 yards in size, uses a four-step course to remove an iPhone battery with a spark of -80 Celsius (-176 Fahrenheit) diploma air, and then pop out screws and modules, together with the haptic module that makes a phone vibrate.

The elements are then sent off to recyclers for the minerals to be extracted and refined.

Daisy can dismantle 200 iPhones every hour, stated Jackson.

Apple is contemplating sharing the Daisy technology with others, along with electric auto manufacturers.

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